Grounding Exercises for Stability

 
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“Being ungrounded is a worldwide phenomenon, more than half the population are floating around unaware.”

 

Grounding is a concept that can make you feel more connected to the earth, both physically and emotionally. It functions to clear the mind, recharge energy, strengthen your instincts and calm emotions. It allows you to be more authentically in your body, more present in the moment and is particularly useful in times of overwhelm or stress.

Being ungrounded is a worldwide phenomenon, more than half the population are floating around unaware. It’s the cause of a huge amount of stress and suffering. If you have a sneaky suspicion that you might experience ungrounding from time to time outlined below are some of the signs to look out for.

Signs that you are ungrounded

  • Feeling spaced out

  • Being easily distracted

  • Rumination

  • Anxiety or perpetual worry

  • Obsession with personal image

  • Deception by yourself or others

  • Strong desire for material things

On top of these emotional signs there are physical signs too that point to ungrounding some of which included inflammation, poor sleep, chronic pain, fatigue or poor circulation. Being grounded in your body comes with all kinds of positive benefits. For starters you’ll feel strong, centered, steady and less stressed.

Benefits of Grounding

  • Reduced stress levels. When grounded the rhyme of the stress hormone cortisol begins to normalise. Cortisol is connected to your body’s stress response and helps control blood sugar levels. In addition to this it regulates metabolism, helps reduce inflammation and helps with memory functioning.  

  • Improves circulation by helping with the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to the tissues in your body, including better blood flow to your face.

  • Reduces inflammation

  • Improves sleep

  • Reduces some risk factors of cardiovascular disease

  • Reduces pain

  • Shifts the body from the stressed fight-or-flight mode to the restorative rest-and-digest mode

Grounding Techniques

Cover Your Crown

This exercise is SO simple but so so effective. When you’re ungrounded simply place one hand over the crown of your head. Close your eyes to avoid distractions. It’s that simple.

Hold for 1-2 minutes.

Feel Your Feet

This is another easy peasy one that can ground you in minutes. Sit or stand and place all your awareness on the bottom of your feet, every last it of it. Pay attention to any sensations, any feels at all.

Practice for 1 minute.

Follow Your Breath

Close your eyes and as you inhale, trace the air as it enters your nose and goes into your lungs. On the exhale, follow the air leaving your lungs and exiting your nose or mouth.

This grounding technique gets more effective with practice. The key is to observe the breath instead of forcing it with your mind. Let your body lead and your mind will follow.

Time: 5 to 10 minutes

Stand Like a Tree

Stand with your feet parallel and at least shoulder’s width apart. Keep your head floating above your body, chin tucked, and spine straight. Rest your hands at your side or place them over your belly button. Sink all of your body’s weight and tension into your feet (without collapsing your posture), allowing it to be absorbed into the ground. To support this grounding process, imagine roots growing out the bottom of your feet, extending deep into the ground beneath you.

Time: 1 minute to 10 minutes.

Take a Cold Shower

Cold exposure has shown to increase immunity, reduce fat, and elevate mood (by triggering dopamine). If you’re not accustomed to cold showers, at the end of your hot shower, make the water warm/cool for 30 seconds. Over the course of the next three weeks, make the water slightly cooler and stay under it for longer. By the end of the three weeks, your body will get used to the cold temperature. It’s an invigorating and grounding experience. I recommend it unless you have high blood pressure.

Time: 30 seconds to 5 minutes.


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About The Author

Siobhan is a Trainee Psychotherapist, Mental Health Advocate and Editor of crakd. She’s also embroiled in an intense love affair with eclectic interiors and colourful food.

Follow Siobhan on Instagram @siobhan_scan 


 

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